How To Pick The Perfect Pot or Planter For Your Plant!

Okay, well, that’s a bit of a mouthful!

We like to think of planters like shoes for people, mainly because you need to make sure everything fits, you’re entirely comfortable and have a bit of wiggle room for growth. Here are the most common questions you may have when purchasing a new planter:

  1. When should I buy a planter to fit my newly purchased plant that has a nursery pot?  
  •    A plant that’s bursting at the seams with dirt rising up and out the sides should be replanted as soon as possible because it’s outgrown its existing nursery pot. Typically it’s good practice to re-pot your plant when you buy a new family member since it’s in peak condition - having only just come from the growers, therefore will be wanting room to grow and thrive even more!

 


%subtitle_start%

Okay, well, that’s a bit of a mouthful!
%subtitle_stop%


%description_start%

We like to think of planters like shoes for people, mainly because you need to make sure everything fits, you’re entirely comfortable and have a bit of wiggle room for growth. Here are the most common questions you may have when purchasing a new planter:
%description_stop%

 


%list1_title_start%
1. When should I buy a planter to fit my newly purchased plant that has a nursery pot?  

%list1_title_stop%


%list1_description_start%

A plant that’s bursting at the seams with dirt rising up and out the sides should be replanted as soon as possible because it’s outgrown its existing nursery pot. Typically it’s good practice to re-pot your plant when you buy a new family member since it’s in peak condition - having only just come from the growers, therefore will be wanting room to grow and thrive even more!
%list1_description_stop%


%list1_img_start%
//cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0093/4412/2980/files/LP_large.png
%list1_img_stop%

 

%list2_title_start%
2. Why do some people call it “planter” and some people call it “pot”? It’s driving me potty.

%list2_title_stop%


%list2_description_start%

Most people nowadays use the terms interchangeably. But there is a difference between the terms ‘planter’ and ‘pot’ that might not be obvious at first glance. Pots tend to be quite small and usually contain just one individual plant. Planters tend to be bigger, outside-orientated and house multiple plants. However, we like everyone else prefer the term planter (sounds cool right) :)
%list2_description_stop%


%list2_img_start%
//cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0093/4412/2980/files/DL_large.png
%list2_img_stop%

 

%list3_title_start%
3. Do I have to re-pot my plant?

%list3_title_stop%


%list3_description_start%

  <ul>

<li>Repotting is essential when you own a plant, and there’s no escaping it. Don’t worry, it’s very therapeutic and incredibly rewarding once you’ve given it a go the first time. Top tips: lay down a protective sheet or newspaper to pick up all the soil if you’re doing it inside, and choose a soil suitable to the plant species.</li>
<li>
If you don’t repot, you’ll find your plants start to die. This is because they’re trying to shrink themselves to fit in, but this will usually result in a weakened plant that can become susceptible to disease and other plant-y problems! ☹
</li>
<li>
Don’t forget to add holes to the bottom of your pot! (or just buy a pot with holes already in it). Drainage is SO important when it comes to plants, and you won’t want water collecting at the bottom of the pot because it will merely become stagnant and promote mould growth!

</li>

%list3_description_stop%


%list3_img_start%
//cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0093/4412/2980/files/LP_large.png
%list3_img_stop%

 




       

       

       

       

      %list4_title_start%
      4. What kind of style is best for a planter?

      %list4_title_stop%


      %list4_description_start%

      This is a tough question and down entirely to taste. However, we here at Leaf Envy prefer quality shapes, materials and colours. What we mean by this is; clean, simple minimalist designed planters that have a splash of colour or chic finish, and that use porous materials (such as Clay/ Ceramics). Being porous is important, since you don’t want water to collect and cause root rot.
      %list4_description_stop%


      %list4_img_start%
      //cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0093/4412/2980/files/DL_large.png
      %list4_img_stop%



      • RELATED ARTICLES •

      Creating a Happy Home for Your Houseplants
      Creating a Happy Home for Your Houseplants
      Just as you need your own private space to relax and grow, so do your plants, so let’s take this time to learn how to curate the best environment for all!   Temperature is Key How do you feel when you get home in the middle of winter, an...
      Read More
      10 Thoughtful Tips to Help Your House Plants Thrive
      10 Thoughtful Tips to Help Your House Plants Thrive
        Plants, like people, are all unique. However, these are the tried and tested #planthacks you can follow to create, build and grow the indoor jungle of your dreams! #1 Leaf damage, bugs and other pollutants that could cause a whole hos...
      Read More
      How to Increase Humidity for Your Houseplants
      How to Increase Humidity for Your Houseplants
      While plants don’t like hot, dry air (okay not you cacti/ succulents), they do love humidity. Think tropical environments and rainforests, which is where most houseplants originate. So how do you create a micro-environment in your home w...
      Read More